Updated: P.E.A.C.E. working to expand winterization program
11/07/2005 10:44:00 PM | Author: baloghblog
UPDATE: Posted from the comments:
phil said... It might be a great idea, but the implementation (as usual in this town) is severely lacking. The weatherization program from NYS is run in each county by the local Community Action Program--PEACE, Inc. in Onondaga. They do a fairly good job--energy audit, some insulation and some other small repairs.

The problem is the YEAR AND A HALF WAITING LIST. This is only one of many programs for low/moderate income families with long waits. Try negotiating any of the programs to help families with loans to make serious home repairs (roofs, foundations, plumbing etc.)

This program got the publicity in the paper because the Gifford Foundation paired up with a small local non-profit to provide funding for a very small number of families in a tiny neighborhood on the Southside (about 5 square blocks). The foundation money allow these families to jump the queue and get their work done now.

Explain to the families on the outside of this boundary why they have to wait 18 months.
It's a shame that this program suffers from bureaucracy. Perhaps if more light were shed on the issue, a few more dollars might be allocated and the waiting list would shorten.

Original post:

I didn't know that they were doing this in our area, but I think that it is a great idea.

Syracuse.com:

Alexander Williams is trying to restore his home on Syracuse's South Side to top-notch condition.

It's a task made easier by the more than $4,000 worth of work being done on the house for free by P.E.A.C.E. Inc.

The work which includes insulation being blown into the walls and a new energy-efficient refrigerator is part of P.E.A.C.E.'s weatherization program.

"This helps a lot, especially with heating costs going up the way they are," said Williams, who lives on South State Street. "With the energy savings, I will have more money in my pocket to do other work."

Williams' home was the backdrop for an announcement Wednesday that P.E.A.C.E. is expanding its program through a partnership with the Rosamond Gifford Charitable Corp. and a $200,000 grant from the state Department of Housing and Community Renewal.

P.E.A.C.E. generally spends about $1.4 million a year to winterize 330 homes.

The $200,000 will allow the agency to do an additional 44 homes this year, said Ray Yehle, director of P.E.A.C.E. Inc.'s home energy program.

[snip]

Yehle said the average American spends about 3 percent of his or her income on energy, whereas lower-income Americans spend about 14 percent.

"That's a reflection of the fact that they have less income, so they are spending a higher percentage, and also that lower-income people tend to live in the worst housing stock," Yehle said.

"This place, for instance," Yehle said while pointing to Williams' State Street home, "probably has never been insulated. The amount of energy it takes to heat a place like that can be extraordinary."

Williams said Yehle was right.

"It has never been insulated," Williams said. "It is going to make a big difference."

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2 comments:

On 10:30 PM , phil said...

It might be a great idea, but the implementation (as usual in this town) is severely lacking. The weatherization program from NYS is run in each county by the local Community Action Program--PEACE, Inc. in Onondaga. They do a fairly good job--energy audit, some insulation and some other small repairs.

The problem is the YEAR AND A HALF WAITING LIST. This is only one of many programs for low/moderate income families with long waits. Try negotiating any of the programs to help families with loans to make serious home repairs (roofs, foundations, plumbing etc.)

This program got the publicity in the paper because the Gifford Foundation paired up with a small local non-profit to provide funding for a very small number of families in a tiny neighborhood on the Southside (about 5 square blocks). The foundation money allow these families to jump the queue and get their work done now.

Explain to the families on the outside of this boundary why they have to wait 18 months.

Anyway--I enjoy reading your blog. Good information with an interesting point of view. Even made me want to start canning tomatoes like my mom used to do every summer--we never had to buy tomato sauce when I was a kid.

 
On 1:46 PM , Anonymous said...

Any idea of the exact streets that are covered by that 5 block radius on the southside? I'm curious if my house qualifies.